Sociology

Classes

SOC 100 : Survey of General Sociology

This course is an introduction to the scientific discipline of sociology. It will focus on key concepts, main theoretical perspectives, and research findings used by sociologists to explain the social world and social interaction. The course examines the fundamental components and institutions that makeup the structure of human societies as well as the basic processes and direction of social change.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Summarize and distinguish the three main theoretical perspectives in sociology.
  • Analyze and apply specific sociological theories and perspectives to human behavior and social issues.
  • Explain and evaluate how society and culture affect our beliefs, values, behavior, and thinking patterns.
  • Express and communicate ideas and opinions clearly in writing.

SOC 214 : Introduction to Race and Ethnic Relations

This course focuses on race and ethnic relations from local (Hawaii), national, and international perspectives; patterns of race/ethnic relations; and the social, economic, and political problems associated with racial/ethnic conflict.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Explain why sociologists call race a "social construction".
  • Describe examples of racial inequality in the United States.
  • Identify examples of racism and microaggressions.
  • Apply major sociological perspectives to race/ethnic relations at both the micro and structural level. 

SOC 218 : Introduction to Social Problems

This course is a theoretical and substantive survey of the nature and causes of social problems; selected topics may vary from semester to semester.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and utilize sociological perspectives to analyze social problems in society.
  • Use critical thinking skills to evaluate the causes of social problems.
  • Evaluate proposed solutions to social problems.

SOC 231 : Introduction to Juvenile Delinquency

This course focuses on juvenile delinquency in the U.S. and examines the nature of and trends in juvenile delinquency, explanations for and theories of juvenile delinquency, and institutional responses to and treatment of juvenile delinquency in the U.S. juvenile justice system.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Apply sociological theories of juvenile delinquency to contemporary cases.
  • Explain the multiple causes of juvenile delinquency.
  • Describe the differences in male and female offenders.
  • Describe how social institutions prevent and/or contribute to juvenile delinquency.

SOC 251 : Introduction to Sociology of the Family

SOC 251 is the study of human relationships within courtship, marriage, and the family as influenced by culture and society. It is designed to challenge students to re-examine assumptions regarding behavior, decisions, choices, and motivations in interpersonal relationships. The course places particular emphasis on diverse family forms, and the changing nature of how we define family.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify, describe, and analyze major trends in the family from a sociological perspective.
  • Describe and analyze the connections between individual family experiences and larger social institutions.
  • Analyze contemporary social and political issues and describe how those issues affect the family.