Anthropology

Classes

ANTH 151 : Emerging Humanity

This course is an introduction to human biological evolution and the archaeology of culture in the world prior to AD 1500.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Explain how archaeologists gather and use evidence about the past to describe human evolution, cultural change, and environmental relationships.
  • Describe human evolution, applying the theory of natural selection to explain major morphological transitions of the lineage.
  • Discuss the prehistoric and historic relationship(s) among human biology, culture, and environment and compare them to modern environmental challenges.

ANTH 152 : Culture and Humanity

Introduction to cultural anthropology. This course explores how humans create, understand, order and modify their natural, social, supernatural and physical environments, and make meaning and order.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify how cultural perspectives and social norms are socially and historically constructed.
  • Apply anthropological perspectives to critically analyze current social issues.
  • Describe anthropological research methodologies and collect and analyze ethnographic data.
  • Apply anthropological perspectives and research methods to careers and research outside of the discipline.

ANTH 175 : Polynesian Surf Culture

Provides students with an understanding of surf culture in the Pacific Basin. Environmental and cultural factors are assessed in relation to surfing’s development in Polynesia, integration into Hawaiian culture, decline due to Western influence, and revitalization as a modern recreational activity. The modern surfing industry is also assessed through a cultural perspective that analyzes business practices utilized by surfing organizations today.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Discuss environmental and cultural factors affecting the development of surfing in Polynesia.
  • Discuss how surfing has evolved due to western influence and modern popular culture.
  • Discuss modern social and legal issues relating to surfing.

ANTH 175L : Surf Culture Field Lab

Complements the lecture materials presented in the ANTH 175. Provides students with an understanding of surf culture in the Pacific Basin using O‘ahu as a model for understanding ancient and modern surfing culture in Hawai‘i. Field activities include surfing demonstrations and instruction, opportunities to speak with local cultural informants, and fieldtrips to various museums to learn about Hawai‘i’s surfing heritage. A coastal tour of O‘ahu will be made to study the history of several major surf breaks.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit for or registration in ANTH 175.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Discuss environmental and cultural factors affecting the development of surfing in Polynesia.
  • Discuss principles of anthropology as they apply to the creation and shaping of surfing culture.
  • Discuss modern social and legal issues relating to surfing.

ANTH 210 : Archaeology

This course is an introduction to prehistoric archaeology providing a overview of methods and techniques of excavation and laboratory analysis and a brief survey of theory in relation to change and diversity in prehistoric human groups.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Categorize and evaluate the cultural and environmental processes which shape the archaeological record.
  • Demonstrate and compare the major methods used by archaeologists in the field and in the laboratory to discover, excavate, date and interpret human cultural materials. Be able to evaluate the validity and usefulness of the various methods with relationship to actual sites.
  • Examine the major explanatory concepts and theories in archaeology, and analyze how they are used to develop an understanding of development, change and diversity in prehistoric human groups.
  • Analyze examples from specific areas with an emphasis on Hawai‘i to explore how archaeology has been used/misused to develop scientific and popular views of prehistory.
  • Examine and evaluate major issues in Hawai‘i in modern archaeology, especially as they Cultural Resource Management.
  • Discuss the ethical, legal and social implication of archaeological work especially in relation to NAGPRA and how these issues relate to current debates in Hawai‘i.

ANTH 296 : Special Topics in Anthropology

Students will investigate important topics, issues, or subfields within the discipline of Anthropology. May be repeated up to 9 credits with different topics.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

“C” or better in ANTH 151 or ANTH 152

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the important concepts and facts particular to the selected course topic.
  • Analyze and interpret the nature and significance of the selected course topic.
  • Investigate connections between the selected course topic and contemporary events and issues.