Astronomy

Classes

ASTR 110 : Survey of Astronomy

Introduction to the astronomical universe for non-science students.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Outline the development of astronomy from ancient times to present and explain the role of the scientific method in this historic context.
  • Describe and explain the apparent motions of the celestial bodies, especially as related to naked-eye observations.
  • Identify the appropriate instruments used by astronomers to understand the universe.
  • Outline the origins of our solar system and appraise the leading cosmological theories of the origin of the universe.
  • Describe the physical and chemical properties of the objects in our solar system and apply the concept of comparative planetology.
  • Describe the physical and chemical nature of stars, and especially our sun, and apply the astronomical techniques used to measure stellar properties.
  • Outline the evolutionary stages in a star’s life and compare and contrast the structure of our Milky Way and other galaxies.
  • Apply astronomical concepts to the search for extraterrestrial life.

ASTR 110L : Survey of Astronomy Lab

Demonstration of astronomical principles through laboratory observations and analysis of astronomical data. Not required for ASTR 110.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit for or registration in ASTR 110 or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Apply the scientific method to a selected group of topics in astronomy.
  • Collect, report and analyze data obtained in a laboratory and/ or observatory setting in a manner exhibiting organization, proper documentation and critical thinking.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the use of standard astronomical instruments.
  • Perform image analysis, especially as related to astronomical photographic data.
  • Identify environmental factors, which affect the outcome of an experiment or observation and apply basic error analyses techniques.
  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of computer on-line and Internet astronomical programs.

ASTR 130 : Introduction to Archaeoastronomy

Introduction to the interdisciplinary study of cultures and astronomy for non-science majors. Topics include naked-eye astronomy, myths and rituals, calendar systems, architectural alignments and navigation.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe and explain the observable daily motions of celestial bodies.
  • Identify the phases of the moon and explain what causes them.
  • List some cultural associations of the planets.
  • Identify and use measurement tools for determining astronomical alignments.
  • Illustrate how astronomical knowledge can be used in navigation.
  • Compare and contrast how different cultures used astronomical knowledge.
  • Assess the strengths and weaknesses of an interpretation of evidence from an archaeoastronomy site.
  • Explain how culture and science are interrelated.

ASTR 180 : Planetary Astronomy

A survey of modern solar system astronomy with emphasis on the underlying physical principles. Topics discussed include the celestial sphere and aspects of the night sky, the structure and evolution of the Sun’s planetary system, comparative planetology, and theories of the formation of planetary systems. Intended for science majors and prospective science teachers.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Outline the development of planetary astronomy from ancient times to present and explain the role of the scientific method in this historic context.
  • Describe the major geological and atmospheric features of the objects in our Solar System.
  • Describe the physical and chemical properties of the objects in our solar system and apply the concept of comparative planetology.
  • Outline the origins of our Solar System and formulate models that explain the different physical and chemical characteristics of objects within the Solar System.
  • Describe the properties of our Sun and their effects on objects in the Solar System.
  • Outline techniques for discovering extrasolar planets and extraterrestrial life.

ASTR 181 : Stellar Astronomy

A survey of modern stellar, galactic, and extragalactic astronomy, with emphasis on the underlying physical principles. Topics covered include stellar structure, interstellar environments and the formation of stars, stellar evolution and death, the structures of galaxies, and cosmology. Intended for science majors and prospective science teachers. The student should have a good operational familiarity with high school algebra.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Outline the development of stellar astronomy from ancient times to present and explain the role of the scientific method in this historic context.
  • Identify the appropriate instruments used by astronomers to understand the universe and describe the nature of electromagnetic radiation and its role in deciphering the mysteries of stellar astronomy.
  • Describe the physical and chemical nature of stars, and especially our sun, and apply the astronomical techniques used to measure stellar properties.
  • Outline the evolutionary stages in a star’s life, including the role of the interstellar medium.
  • Compare and contrast the structure of our Milky Way and other galaxies.
  • Outline and appraise the leading cosmological theories of the origin of the universe.
  • Apply astronomical concepts to the search for extraterrestrial life.

ASTR 250 : Observational Astronomy

An introduction to the tools and techniques of observational astronomy: astronomical time and coordinate systems, photometric systems and magnitudes, principles of telescopes and their operation, introduction to modern astronomical instruments, analysis of astronomical data. Includes planetary, solar and stellar observations.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for ASTR 110; or ASTR 180 and ASTR 181

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use appropriate celestial charts and astronomical time system to identify and locate celestial objects, such as stars, nebulae, galaxies, planets, satellites and asteroids.
  • Describe the primary functions of an astronomical telescope and major detectors, such as spectrometers and photometers.
  • Apply basic principals in planetary remote sensing and image processing.
  • Outline astronomical techniques involved in observing planetary and stellar objects, such as variable stars, asteroids and the Sun and Moon.
  • Compare and contrast the research involved in optical, radio, infrared and cosmic ray astronomy.
  • Use appropriate techniques to analyze astronomical data.

ASTR 250L : Observational Astronomy Lab

A lab course in modern observational astronomy, with emphasis on “hands-on” use of instruments to acquire data with research-grade telescopes at the college’s Lanihuli Observatory. Remote telescope observations may also be used. Students will gain on-site observing experience with CCD photometry and spectroscopy through direct acquisition and data analysis using modern laboratory data reduction software. Applications to planetary, solar, stellar and, where possible, galactic astrophysics will be covered.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit or current enrollment in ASTR 250

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use appropriate celestial charts and astronomical time system to identify and locate celestial objects, such as stars, nebulae, galaxies, planets, satellites and asteroids.
  • Describe the fundamentals optics and telescopic observations.
  • Operate and make observations with optical, radio and cosmic ray telescopes.
  • Apply basic principals in planetary remote sensing and image processing using both real-time observations and archived data.
  • Apply the techniques of astrophotography and spectrometry.
  • Use appropriate techniques to analyze astronomical data.

ASTR 281 : Space Explorations

Current topics in planetary exploration, extraterrestrial life, and space resources and colonization.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for ASTR 110 or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Outline the characteristics and origins of objects in our solar system, including the sun, planets, moons, meteoroids, asteroids and comets.
  • Compare and contrast terrestrial and Jovian worlds and apply geological and atmospherical concepts to comparative planetology.
  • Explain the effects and implications of collisional impacts on planetary surfaces.
  • Apply the laws of planetary motion and celestial mechanics.
  • Outline the historical development of manned and unmanned space flight.
  • Identify and describe the appropriate instruments, detectors and space probes used by astronomers and space scientists to explore the solar system, especially in the area of remote sensing.
  • Discuss the future of space colonization and exploitation.
  • Discuss the nature and origin of life on earth and apply the astronomical concepts related to the search for extraterrestrial life.

ASTR 294V : Special Topics in Astronomy

This course covers current topics in astronomy. The course is designed to have variable credit to coincide with the rigor of the topic. May be repeated up to 8 credits with different topics. A course description will be presented in the schedule of classes.

Credits:

1 - 4

Prerequisites:

Credit for ASTR 110 or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the important concepts and facts presented for the topic under examination.
  • Make inferences and draw conclusions from the special topics under discussion.
  • Apply skills appropriate to the topic under discussion.
  • Evaluate the science and technology of astronomy and space science.