Interdisciplinary Studies

Classes

IS 103 : Introduction to College

This course offers strategies for success in college and life-long learning. It emphasizes understanding yourself, setting and attaining goals, critical thinking, effective communication, relationship building, study habits and skills, time management, college resources, and setting your foundation to succeed. Students will participate in and lead classroom learning through discussions, readings, writing assignments, group activities, and hands-on experiences.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify personal characteristics (e.g., learning styles, strengths and weaknesses, habits of mind) and analyze how these impact decision-making and success.
  • Consider those factors which impact student relationships with others and articulate strategies and skills to encourage strong relationship building.
  • Identify college policies and resources related to students.
  • Practice learning strategies (e.g., note-taking, time management, test-taking) to increase success in college coursework.

IS 105B : Career Decision Making

An introductory course designed to prepare students to make more focused career/life decisions through self analysis and world of work examinations.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe the career development process, current labor market trends, and issues related to economic self-sufficiency.
  • Identify personal, family, cultural, and financial influences that relate to their career and educational decisions.
  • Apply career knowledge by exploring their interests, skills, values, personality traits.
  • Illustrate how their career search relates to job shadowing and service learning activities choices.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of the career decision making process by keep a journal and responding to evaluations of the instructor.

IS 105C : Professional Employment Preparation

Facilitates employment search by emphasizing professional techniques and standards in the preparation of application forms, resumes, cover letters, and employment interviews.

Credits:

1

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Integrate job interview preparation techniques into a live interview.
  • Utilize resources needed to find a job.
  • Assemble a career portfolio for ongoing career development.

IS 201 : The Ahupua‘a

Study of the traditional Hawaiian approaches to natural resource development, utilization, exploitation, and management. The ahupua’a, as the traditional Hawaiian unit of land and sea subdivision, beginning in the upland forests, stretching across lower elevations, past the shoreline to the edge of the reef, will be evaluated as a microcosm of an integrated ecosystem and as a model for natural resource management and sustainability.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe how Hawai‘i’s unique geological formation affects its sustainable natural resources.
  • Describe how the ancient migration begins to affect the management of its natural resources and the socio-political fabric of the “new land.”
  • Describe the agri-spiritual relationship between plant and mahi‘ai; and the fish and the lawai‘a.
  • Discuss the ancient and present management value of water.
  • Describe and assist in the reconstruction of lo‘i kaloandlokoi‘a.
  • Describe and discuss the current resources management practices, which augment or negate ancient practices.
  • Research and replicate an artifact of his or her choice.

IS 204 : Themes in Popular Culture

An interdisciplinary study of a specific event, person, idea, or process in popular culture which will bring together various methodologies and conceptual tools to create a complex analysis. Topics covered will include: the concept of popular culture, how elements of popular culture are created and circulated, how elements of popular culture connect to historical, political, social, symbolic and intellectual history, how different groups in society are related to the elements of popular culture, and how popular culture plays a role in the lives of individuals.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the connection between the theme in popular culture with larger political, social, and intellectual patterns in society.
  • Analyze the connection between the theme in popular culture and other themes, either contemporary or historical.
  • Participate effectively in group discussions, given evidence of thoughtfulness and an engagement with other people’s positions.
  • Connect local elements of popular culture to global economic and political systems.
  • Explain and justify an evaluation of the role of popular culture in the student’s life.

IS 231 : The Zombie Apocalypse & Other Doomsday Beliefs in Popular Culture

An interdisciplinary study of the zombie apocalypse and other doomsday beliefs in popular culture which will bring together various methodologies and conceptual tools to create a complex analysis. Topics covered will include: the concept of apocalyptic beliefs in popular culture; how apocalyptic beliefs are created and circulated in popular culture; how elements of apocalyptic beliefs in popular culture connect to historical and contemporary political, social, psychological, and intellectual issues; how different groups and individuals in history and contemporary society relate to apocalyptic beliefs.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify significant themes in representations of doomsday beliefs in popular culture (e.g., social contract, communitarianism, tribalism, realism, liberalism, neo-conservatism, fascism, barbarism, morality).
  • Analyze doomsday beliefs in popular culture using historical, religious, political, philosophical, psychological, social, &/or intellectual frameworks.
  • Evaluate how doomsday beliefs in popular culture serve as metaphor to current issues and events, and provides social commentary on the historical context it was produced in.

IS 295A : Hawaiian Knowledge Innovation Capstone

This is a capstone project course for the Academic Subject Certificate in Hawaiian Knowledge Innovation. Students enrolled in this ASC program will apply knowledge they have learned from both their Information and Computer Science and Hawaiian Studies Classes to develop and finish an independent technology based project using a Hawaiian theme and Hawaiian cultural content. Students will work with two faculty members, one from the Hawaiian Studies/Hawaiian Language disciplines, and one from the Information and Computer Sciences discipline to develop their project. Students can work both individually and in small groups depending on capstone enrollment and faculty approval on a case-by-case basis. Students will be required to meet with faculty mentors regularly throughout the semester. Students will be required to track weekly hours spent on research and project development.  (3 hours cooperative education)

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Instructor Consent

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Document the technical and cultural knowledge and sources needed to carry out project idea.
  • Translate project ideas into a realistic work plan that draws on both technical and cultural sources.
  • Produce and professionally present the project plan and results.