Religion

Classes

REL 150 : Introduction to World’s Major Religions

Introduction to the world’s major religions: Primitive, Hinduism, Buddhism, Shinto, Confucianism, Taoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Fieldtrips maybe required outside class time.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the following elements or dimensions: origin, doctrines, ethics, sacred literature, important figures/founders, rituals, worship, and institutions for each of the world’s major religious traditions.
  • Identify the similarities and differences between two or more religions on the basis of the aforementioned dimensions.
  • Examine the relationship between religion and culture/society.
  • Question and think critically.

REL 151 : Religion and the Meaning of Existence

Introduction to basic issues of the question of the meaning of human existence. Emphasis is placed upon the student analyzing his/her own beliefs and exploring alternative answers.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the various understandings of experience, existence, and/or the Ultimate/Absolute Reality in the world’s religious traditions.
  • Compare and contrast the similarities and differences between these meanings of existence in two or more religions.
  • Identify the rituals, myths, and symbols/art that shape these worldviews.
  • Analyze their belief systems.

REL 201 : Understanding the New Testament

Analysis of the origin and development of the early Christian message as set forth in the New Testament. Special attention will be given to the message of Jesus and Paul and its relevance to the modern world.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Demonstrate awareness of the historical and literary context of the New Testament.
  • Show knowledge of modern Biblical interpretation and criticism.
  • Show an understanding of the major parts and types of literature contained in the New Testament.
  • Demonstrate recognition of how New Testament teachings have shaped modern society and human understanding of self.

REL 202 : Understanding Indian Religions

Historical survey of the teachings and practices of the major religious traditions of India.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Placement in ENG 100, or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the myths, histories, doctrines, and practices of Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, and Sikhism.
  • Identify each religion’s understanding of the human condition, ethics, knowledge, death, the afterlife, and conceptions of the divine.
  • Identify common themes within the religions studied.
  • Interpret primary sources (such as epics, devotional poetry, mystical instruction, myths, and hymns).
  • Examine the relationship between religion and culture/society.
  • Question and think critically.

REL 205 : Understanding HawaIIan Religion

Major Hawaiian religious teachings and practices from ancient times to the present. Investigation of cultural influence of Hawaiian religious beliefs; analysis of religious texts and relation to other traditions. This course may be applied to the BA language/culture core requirements at UH Mānoa.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and access major sources on Hawaiian religion.
  • Express thoughts on Hawaiian religion in oral and written form.
  • Compare and contrast elements of the Hawaiian religious experience with others or with their own.
  • Identify ways in which Hawaiian religious thought and practice continues in the present.
  • Interpret some symbolism of Hawaiian religious ritual and poetry.

REL 206 : Understanding Confucianism

Exploration of Confucianism in its philosophical, cultural, and historical context in China.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Analyze the primary and secondary texts.
  • Explore the relevance of these texts to contemporary issues today, both in China and elsewhere.
  • Describe the origins and major historical periods in Confucian belief and practice.
  • Examine the relationship between religion and culture/society.

REL 207 : Understanding Buddhism

Survey of major forms and practices of Buddhism.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the myths, histories, doctrines, and practices of the major schools of Buddhism.
  • Identify each school’s understanding of the human condition, ethics, knowledge, death, the afterlife, and conceptions of the divine.
  • Interpret primary sources.
  • Examine the relationship between religion and culture/society.
  • Question and think critically.

REL 212 : Science Fiction and Religion

This course explores and reflects on the presence of religions and religious themes in science fiction films and television shows. Students will also discuss the ethics of robots and other forms of artificial intelligence (AI). This course explores the presence of religious themes such as the messianic hero, immortality, free will and determinism, prophecy, evil, mysticism, and apocalypse in films and tv shows including Star Trek, Star Wars, the Matrix, I Robot, Avatar, Superman, and more.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the presence of the major religious motifs in science fiction films and television shows.
  • Analyze the hero archetype, the monomyth, in religious literature and science fiction media.
  • Investigate the ways in which science fiction constitutes contemporary religious myth-making.
  • Examine the influence and impact that artificial intelligence will have on society.

 

REL 217 : Understanding Polynesian Religions

This course provides an introduction to the study of Polynesian religions through an exploration of the oral traditions of Hawaiʻi, Aotearoa (New Zealand), French Polynesia (Tahiti et al.), and Samoa among others. In this class, students will gain a foundational understanding of important religious themes that permeate Polynesia. Main themes include but are not limited to deities’ forms & functions, cosmogonies, etiologies, and belief-regulated practices. Additionally, a portion of the semester will focus on belief narratives as vehicles for the transmission of knowledge and the significance of contemporary representation and self-representation of Polynesian religion and culture. This class will use comparative analysis between Hawaiian religion and the religious traditions of Aotearoa, French Polynesia, and Samoa to identify the fundamental concepts needed to understand Polynesian religions and explore how they are interconnected and interwoven into the fabric of our lives today. (Cross-listed as HWST 217)

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and describe significant source-language terms, major figures, and stories in Hawaiian and other Polynesian religions
  • Identify and describe important themes common to Hawaiian and other Polynesian religions
  • Analyze, compare, contrast, major themes common to Hawaiian and other Polynesian religions

REL 296 : Special Topics in Religion

Students will investigate important topics in the study of religion such as Sacred Places, Religion and the Media, or Religion and Politics. A specific course description will be printed in the schedule of classes.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the important concepts and facts associated with the topic under examination.
  • Explain cause and effect relationships in connection to the topic discussed.
  • Compare and contrast various religions’ ideas of the topic.
  • Relate the topic to contemporary events.