Hawaiian Studies

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

HWST 107 : Hawai‘i: Center of the Pacific

An introduction to Hawai‘i and Hawaiian culture in the context of the larger Pacific, including Hawaiian origins, settlement, language, land, history, society, religion and the arts.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Compare and contrast cultures and histories of Pacific island peoples in relation to their languages, religious traditions, artistic expressions, material culture, and political and economic development.
  • Identify ways in which the environment has shaped Hawaiian and Pacific island culture.
  • Describe the integration of land in Hawaiian culture and the historic changes in the relationship between people and land through written and oral communication.
  • Describe aspects of Hawaiian relationship with other groups of people in and outside of Hawai‘i.
  • Identify, access, and evaluate major Hawaiian studies sources.
  • Identify implications of the relationships and develop proposals for possible ways to affect positive change.

HWST 110 : Huakaʻi Waʻa: Introduction to Hawaiian Voyaging

This course introduces students to modern Hawaiian canoe voyaging through a beginning examination of the science and narratives of ancient voyaging, the history of the modern revival of voyaging, and the Hawaiian navigator’s toolkit.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Show knowledge of location of the Hawaiian islands and island groups of Oceania.
  • Explain the various aboriginal and academic narratives relating to the migration to and settlement of Oceania
  • Discuss the historical and cultural events leading to the revival and reestablishment of Hawaiian voyaging
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the tools contemporary navigators use for open-ocean voyaging

HWST 115 : Mo‘okūauhau: HawaIIan Genealogies

This is a course in which students will learn about the centrality of genealogy to Hawaiian history, culture, and family. Students of any ancestry or background will gain value in learning about a central aspect of Hawaiian culture, and in doing research that is geared toward either their own family genealogy or the researching of the genealogies of public figures, or historical figures. Students will be guided through a research process and set of research methodologies for vital statistics, land, tax, census, historical material, and online resources. Students will also learn chiefly and family genealogies of Hawai‘i, which is a Hawaiian method through which some of the history of Hawai‘i is also explored. By completion of the semester, students will be expected to assemble a genealogy and family history beyond what they might already have completed before enrollment in this class for either themselves or a public figure cleared by the instructors of this course.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the centrality and importance of genealogy to Hawaiian culture.
  • Show knowledge of some of the major genealogies of Hawaiian chiefs and large families in Hawai‘i.
  • Demonstrate the ability to conduct research in public and private institutions in Hawai’i, and through the use of internet genealogy web sites.
  • Show that they are able to research and construct a genealogy and family history.

HWST 130 : Hula ‘Ōlapa: Traditional HawaIIan Dance

In this class students will learn various beginning traditional hula interpretations. Students will be taught the basic footwork and hand gestures of traditional hula accompanied by chanting, Ipu Heke (double gourd) or Pahu (drum). Students may also be required to make accompanying instruments like Ipu (smaller single gourd), Kala‘au (sticks), ‘Ili‘ili (stones), and Pū‘ili (split bamboo), and learn accompanying oli (chants) under the direction of the class Instructor. Students will be taught different historical aspects of specific hula, associated hula mythology, ali‘i (chiefly) genealogies, plants and place names.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Learn a basic understanding of the differences between traditional and more modern styles of hula including the significance of hula as part of Hawaiian culture in traditional times.
  • Learn the histories and mythologies behind the creation and performance of various hula.
  • Learn how to perform several hula in unison, and the relationship between movements with the significance of lyrical content in a mele or oli combined with the occasions for which one is dancing.
  • Learn how to prepare adornments for their specific hula.

HWST 131 : Hula Ōlapa ‘elua: Traditional HawaIIan Dance II

Continuation of HWST 130. In this second class, students will learn intermediate traditional hula interpretations. Foot work and hand gestures of traditional hula will be reinforced accompanied by chanting, Ipu Heke (double gourd) or Pahu (drum). Students will be exposed to chants, and pule of traditional and ceremonial protocols related to the discipline of hula. Students may also be required to make accompanying instruments, like Ipu (smaller single gourd), Kala‘au (sticks), ‘Ili‘ili (stones), and Pū‘ili (split bamboo) under the direction of the class instructor. Students will be taught different historical aspects of specific hula, associated hula mythology, ali‘i (chiefly) genealogies; plants, and place names.

Credits:

0

Prerequisites:

Credit for HWST 130, and enrollment in or credit for HAW 101 or HWST 107.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe and discuss the stories behind the creation and performance of various hula.
  • Perform several hula demonstrating the relationship between movements and the significance of lyrical content in mele.
  • Prepare and use adornment for specific hula.

HWST 135 : Kālai Lā‘au: HawaIIan Woodwork and Wood Carving

This is a Hawaiian cultural woodwork and wood carving project class. This class will involve the development of two to three introductory woodworking projects of Hawaiian cultural significance or ceremonial use. through this class the students will develop both the skills needed to work effectively and safely with wood, and the cultural knowledge important to the pieces developed. As a project class, there will be specific projects and themes set by the instructor of general Hawaiian cultural interest. Students will learn different aspects and solutions in carving and creating Hawaiian cultural projects.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Learn to plan and create wood working projects of Hawaiian cultural relevance or significance.
  • Gain a deeper insight into Hawaiian cultural use of wood.
  • Gain deeper understanding of the cultural significance of the wood-working project the student has undertaken.
  • Learn to work with wood in an effective and safe manner.

HWST 136 : Kālai Lā‘au II: Advanced Techniques in HawaIIan Carving

This is a Hawaiian cultural carving class that is a continuation of the themes and techniques learned in HWST 135 Kālai La‘au. Students will be required to complete at least one large piece and two highly finished smaller pieces. Students will be expected to have a basic understanding of carving upon entering the class and will spend their time fine tuning and working on a larger scale. through this class students will develop skills and techniques with more advanced tools needed to work effectively and safely with wood, bone, and/or stone, and students will acquire the cultural knowledge important to the pieces developed. Students will also learn how to make some of the tools required for use in the class.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for HWST 135 with a grade of “B” or better, or consent of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Students will plan and complete carving projects using advanced tools on wood, stone, and bone in an effective and safe manner.
  • Students will research and analyze Hawaiian cultural use of wood, bone, and stone.
  • Students will be able to design, forge and finish a tool for use in carving projects.

HWST 140 : Mahi‘ai I: HawaIIan Taro Culture

The first mahi‘ai course in a series of four in Hawaiian cultivation practices. Covers the history, lore, and geographically specific methods of mahi‘ai. Emphasis on the cultivation of kalo and related staple foods.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Tell the Mo‘olelo (traditional history) of kalo
  • Explain the cultural significance of kalo in Hawaiian culture
  • Identify varieties of kalo and their characteristics
  • Record and analyze observations of kalo cultivation
  • Create papa ku‘i ‘ai

HWST 142 : Mahi‘ai Kalo II - Traditional and Modern Techniques of Lo‘i Kalo Production

This course expands on the traditional Hawaiian kalo growing knowledge covered in the first class to include the ecology of wetland kalo systems, focusing on traditional loʻi techniques, and the integration of nutrient flow analysis through the ahupuaʻa and nutrient management practices for lo‘i kalo. Additional emphasis is placed on both scientific and practical approaches. Cooking and eating are used throughout the course to demonstrate linkages between kalo and human nutrition and wellbeing. The course will consist of a mixture of lecture and hands-on field experience.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

A grade of C or better in HWST 140 or consent of instructor

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Explain traditional Hawaiian and modern technical farming terminology and processes;
  • Discuss nutrients, nutrient budgets, or nutrient cycling in loʻi kalo farming;
  • Identify major patterns of nutrient flows in ahupuaʻa/watershed systems and the impacts of changes to those patterns.

HWST 215 : Oli Hōlona: Beginning Hawaiian Protocol and Chant

An introduction to beginning Hawaiian protocol(s) and chant. Students will learn types of chants, voice quality, modes of chanting, and their basic elements of place chants at an introductory level.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in HWST 107 or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Illustrate the history and types of oli and their role in protocol.
  • Demonstrate techniques and performance of basic oli pule and oli mele.

HWST 217 : Understanding Polynesian Religions

This course provides an introduction to the study of Polynesian religions through an exploration of the oral traditions of Hawaiʻi, Aotearoa (New Zealand), French Polynesia (Tahiti et al .), and Samoa among others. In this class, students will gain a foundational understanding of important religious themes that permeate Polynesia. Main themes include but are not limited to deities’ forms & functions, cosmogonies, etiologies, and belief-regulated practices. Additionally, a portion of the semester will focus on belief narratives as vehicles for the transmission of knowledge and the significance of contemporary representation and self-representation of Polynesian religion and culture. This class will use comparative analysis between Hawaiian religion and the religious traditions of Aotearoa, French Polynesia, and Samoa to identify the fundamental concepts needed to understand Polynesian religions and explore how they are interconnected and interwoven into the fabric of our lives today. (Cross-listed as REL 217)

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and describe significant source-language terms, major figures, and stories in Hawaiian and other Polynesian religions
  • Identify and describe important themes common to Hawaiian and other Polynesian religions
  • Analyze, compare, contrast, major themes common to Hawaiian and other Polynesian religions

HWST 222 : Ma‘awe No‘eau: HawaIIan Fiber Work

This is a Hawaiian cultural fiber arts project class. This class will involve the development of three to four introductory fiber arts projects of Hawaiian cultural significance or ceremonial use. through this class students will learn how to procure the materials needed to complete various fiber arts projects, including learning related protocol and methods for gathering, understanding of Native Hawaiian gathering rights, and the type of environments in which specific materials grow and can be gathered, Students will develop the skills needed to work effectively and safely with various fiber arts materials on introductory projects, and students will learn the cultural knowledge important to the pieces created. As a project class, there will be specific projects and themes set by the instructor of general Hawaiian cultural interest.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Plan, create, and finish, in a safe and effective manner, fiber arts projects of Hawaiian cultural relevance or significance.
  • Explain issues and history of fiber material use in Hawaiian culture and, observing cultural protocols, apply these to gathering materials for a fiber arts project.

HWST 238 : Native Voices through Contemporary Hawaiian and Indigenous Literature

This course surveys contemporary Literature of Native Hawaiians and other Indigenous Peoples, especially to focus on the situational and cultural impetus from which these texts were created.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in ENG 100 and HWST 107 or PACS 108, or instructor consent.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the authors of the 19th and 20th century from a range of ethnic and cultural groups.
  • Describe knowledge of major themes seen across different ethnic or cultural literary works.
  • Discuss knowledge in the diversity of literary opinions, conflict and commonality in examined literary texts.

HWST 253 : Kamehameha I and the Hawaiian Kingdom

Kamehameha I, also known as Paiʻea, Ka Naʻi Aupuni, and Kaiwakiloumoku is the most famous Hawaiian in history. This course will look at the rise to power of Kamehameha I, as he consolidated all of the islands under his control establishing the Hawaiian Kingdom. We will examine his genealogy and chiefly family relations including, his most famous exploits and battles, the olelo noʻeau (wise sayings) related to his life, and the cultural and political legacies he has left Hawaiʻi.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify important events and characters associated with the life and events of Kamehameha’s time.
  • Compare and contrast different ideas and values we see in the stories about Kamehameha.
  • Relate the life and events of Kamehameha’s time to contemporary events and issues.

HWST 255 : Introduction to the HawaIIan Kingdom

This course covers the origins and features of the Hawaiian state. Starting with Hawai‘i’s roots as a navigator society, this course explores the island kingdoms of Kaua‘i, O‘ahu, Maui and Hawai‘i island. Detailed interaction between Hawaiians and navigators from other countries around the world such as Cook and Vancouver open up an investigation through the reign of Kamehameha I and his powerful wife Ka‘ahumanu. The decision to construct a constitutional monarchy, achieve state recognition and develop a modern nation-state are examined further through the eighty-eight year period of Kingdom of Hawai‘i statecraft. Using tools from history, linguistics, political science and law, students will engage the transition of Hawaiian political systems as they emerged across specific periods with an eye towards developing theoretical frameworks for understanding why Hawaiian political systems progressed as they did.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

A grade of “C” or better in HWST 107, HIST 284 or HIST 224.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and analyze key narratives, historical figures and events in the discovery and settlement of the Hawaiian Islands.
  • Identify and analyze key historical figures and events in the formation and development of the Hawaiian nation and state through the 19th century.
  • Describe and analyze the historical interaction between Hawaiian and European values, ideas and technology as they relate to political systems.

HWST 263 : Hawaiian and Indigenous Film

This course is a study of films created by Hawaiian and Indigeneous cinematic filmmakers and their adaptation to the screen in cinematic storytelling. Focus is to be placed on the narrative and dramatic film genre.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in ENG 100, as well as C or better in HWST 107 or PACS 108, or instructor consent.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Illustrate major themes seen across different filmic works.
  • Describe the diversity of filmic opinions, conflict, and commonality in cinematic stories.
  • Discuss cinematic stories and storytellers from a range of ethnic and cultural indigenous groups.

HWST 270 : HawaIIan Mythology

A survey of gods, ‘aumakua, kupua, mythical heroes, heroines and their kinolau as the basis of traditional Hawaiian metaphor.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for HWST 107 or HAW 102.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Evaluate and analyze the relationship between Hawaiian mo‘olelo, Hawaiian religion, and Hawaiian social structure.
  • Analyze how Hawaiian mo‘olelo illustrate and set precedents for Hawaiian cultural values.
  • Compare and contrast Hawaiian and Western concepts of ‘history’ and ‘myth’.
  • Identify and access major written and oral sources for Hawaiian mo‘olelo.
  • Recount with details at least one Hawaiian mo‘olelo and illustrate similarities with others.
  • Describe and classify different characters from Hawaiian mo‘olelo.

HWST 273 : Tattoo Traditions of Polynesia

An overview of the traditional tattoo practices of the various Polynesian islands within the context of the great Pacific.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Compare and contrast the migrations and the peopling of the Pacific focusing on ancestral connections and continuities in the tattoo practices of the Pacific peoples.
  • Identify primary and secondary source material and incorporate original documents in their analysis whenever possible.
  • Identify the cultural contexts and differences (both traditional and modern) among the tattoo styles of the primary Polynesian groups.

HWST 275 : Wahi Pana: Mythology of the HawaIIan Landscape

Wahi Pana: Mythology of the Landscape, is designed to illuminate Hawaiian intelligence regarding the geographic features of these islands. Students will undertake a basic study of the natural sciences from a Western/modern perspective. They will then look at various Hawaiian chants and epic tales to explore the connections with indigenous knowledge forms found in a Hawaiian worldview. Cross-cultural comparisons are made with the goal of bringing forth specific, physical information about important Hawaiian places. Students will gain cultural awareness of their surroundings through the bridging of geography and the mythology studied, thus creating a more Hawaiian sense-of-place in our community.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Grade of “C” or better in HWST 107, or HWST 270.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Students will compare and contrast landscape descriptions, mythology, and human behavior from different cultural perspectives.
  • Students will analyze Hawaiian mythology as it applies to Hawaiian place names, Native Hawaiian social history, and Native Hawaiian relationship to the natural environment.
  • The student will explain the importance of place in the island ecosystem and the values of environmental sustainability.

HWST 275L : Wahi Pana: Mythology of the HawaIIan Landscape Field Lab

This field lab supports HWST 275. Together, they illuminate Hawaiian intelligence regarding the geographic features of these islands. The course highlights the Ko‘olau districts (Waimānalo to Waimea) or O‘ahu as a living classroom resource where the Wahi Pana (sacred places) and mythology of the landscape can be seen and appreciated. Students will explore connections between the social and natural sciences, and indigenous knowledge forms found in a Hawaiian worldview from observing their physical surroundings. Cross-cultural comparisons are made with the goal of bringing forth specific, physical information about important Hawaiian places.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Enrollment or credit in HWST 275 lecture component.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Students will examine the physical properties of the geographic landscape to identify their place in Hawaiian myths.
  • Students will observe the physical properties of the physical landscape and describe them from a Hawaiian worldview.

HWST 285 : Lā‘au Lapa‘au I: HawaIIan Medicinal Herbs

In this class students will learn the basic philosophy and traditions surrounding Hawaiian healing herbs. Students will also learn how to identify, grow, harvest, prepare, store and use these herbs for various human ailments.

Credits:

4

Prerequisites:

Credit for HWST 107 or BOT 105.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Learn Hawaiian and introduced medicinal herbs and be able to identify them by name, color, smell, taste, and sight.
  • Learn the beliefs and practices of Hawaiian herbal healing.
  • Learn planting, growing and harvesting techniques used to raise traditional Hawaiian herbal healing plants.
  • Prepare, use and store Hawaiian herbal remedies.

HWST 296 : Special Topics in HawaIIan Studies

Students will investigate important topics in Hawaiian Studies such as specific people, events, or periods. May be repeated up to 9 credits with different topics.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

“C” or better in HWST 107.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the important concepts and facts particular to the selected course topic.
  • Analyze and interpret the nature and significance of the selected course topic.
  • Investigate connections between the selected course topic and contemporary events and issues.