Music

Degrees and Certificates

Classes

MUS 106 : Intro to Music Literature

Elements, styles, and forms of music, from the listener’s standpoint. Focus on classical music literature. Concert attendance and written critique required for two live performances during semester.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify masterpieces of classical music repertoire.
  • Distinguish the essential compositional characteristics of the several stylistic periods in music/art history and representative composers from each period, which help place unfamiliar repertoire into familiar periods.
  • Contrast/compare music of any type (i.e., classical, popular, ethnic, seasonal) for texture, form, melodic contour, harmonic orientation and time of composition.
  • Compare/contrast the live performances seen during the semester.
  • Define the elements that make up classical performance tradition and etiquette.

MUS 107 : Music in World Cultures

Music as organized sound and as a cultural object. Role of music in various societies: ancient and modern, sophisticated and non-sophisticated, child and adult, Western and non-Western. Representative styles and regional characteristics viewed in terms of musical characteristics and related cultural factors; a conceptual introduction to music and culture. Attendance at one ethnic performance is required.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe the role of music in different cultures.
  • Describe the distinctive aural features and music aesthetics of a music culture.
  • Describe the historical, religious, social, and political aspects of a society that contribute to the development of a music culture.
  • Affirm the validity of other music traditions.
  • Contrast/compare one’s own music within the broader context of other music traditions.

MUS 108 : Music Fundamentals

A basic music theory course. Emphasis on learning basic concepts involved in reading and writing music. Notation and reading of simple and compound rhythm, pitch, intervals and triads. Application to performance.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Read and write music (pitch and rhythm) in conventional notation.
  • Identify and write major and minor key signatures and scales; intervals, triads.
  • Apply knowledge to performance on a primary instrument.
  • Apply knowledge of solfege to diatonic melodies in major and minor keys.

MUS 114 : College Chorus

Rehearsal and performance of choral literature. Open to all students. No previous choral experience required. Attendance at class concerts is required. Repeatable for up to 8 credits.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Read pitch and rhythmic notation in choral parts.
  • Demonstrate musicianship in ensemble singing and professional performance practices.

MUS 121B : Voice 1

Performance class in vocal production and literature for voice. No previous vocal training required. Repeatable for up to 4 credits.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Demonstrate basic vocal techniques of physical alignment, breath support, breath control, and tone production inperformances of several songs.
  • Apply basic concepts of rhythm and pitch accuracy in performances.
  • Employ basic concepts of sight reading in learning music for performance.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices

MUS 121C : Piano 1

Basic principles of performance. Relevant problems in piano literature at elementary level. MUS 121C, 122C must be taken in sequence. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and write the basic concepts of music notation.
  • Demonstrate basic concepts, such as rhythm, notation, dynamics, and expression in accurate performances.
  • Analyze history of piano development.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices.

MUS 121D : Guitar 1

Basic principles of classical guitar performance; relevant problems in literature. Repeatable for up to 4 credits.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and write the basic concepts of music notation.
  • Demonstrate basic concepts, such as rhythm, notation, dynamics, and expression in accurate performances.
  • Analyze history of guitar development.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices.

MUS 121F : Slack Key Guitar 1

Basic principles of performance; relevant problems in literature. Student learns to play two slack key tunings. This course is intended for students with little or no background in this style of guitar playing. Ability to read music is not required. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history of slack key guitar development.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts, such as rhythm, notation, dynamics, and expression in accurate performances.
  • Use knowledge of slack key techniques and music concepts (music theory) to complete in-class recitals.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices.

MUS 121Z : ‘ukulele 1

Introductory course in ‘ukulele. Basic principles of performance; history and development of ‘ukulele playing methods. Focus on principles of performance. Course is intended for students with little or no experience in playing the ukulele. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

Credits:

2

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Discuss the history of ‘ukulele development.
  • Demonstrate basic concepts, such as rhythm, notation, dynamics, and expression in accurate performances.
  • Strum chords in different keys, applying music theory applications.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices.

MUS 122B : Voice 2

Performance class in vocal production and literature for voice. Class is designed for students with previous vocal experience or training. May be repeated up to 4 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in MUS 121B or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Discuss the origin and development of vocal music.
  • Demonstrate intermediate level vocal techniques of diction, tone production, and breath control in performance situations.
  • Sight read and learn music at an intermediate level.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices.

MUS 122C : Piano 2

Designed for further study of principles and basic skills of piano performance established in first semester piano. Continues the group participation chord approach with greater emphasis on ensemble playing and improvisation. MUS 121C and 122C must be taken in sequence. Repeatable for up to 4 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in MUS 121C or consent of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Incorporate additional theoretical concepts in the performance of piano music.
  • Demonstrate musical concepts such as rhythm, notation, dynamics, and expression in accurate performances of the level-two repertoire.
  • Sight read music with increasing accuracy and musicianship.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices with level-two repertoire.

MUS 122F : Slack Key Guitar 2

Intermediate slack key guitar: level I. Student learns to play solos in C tunings and intermediate solos at level I in tunings learned in the elementary class. May be repeated up to 6 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Credit for MUS 121F or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Incorporate additional theoretical concepts in the performance of slack key music.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of intermediate level concepts on performances.
  • Sight read tablature notation with increasing accuracy and musicianship.
  • Exhibit greater confidence in performing level-two repertoire.

MUS 122Z : ‘ukulele 2

Continuation of MUS 121Z. Increased emphasis on ‘ukulele literature. Focus on principles of performance. Emphasis on ensemble playing. Repeatable for up to 6 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Grade of “C” or better in MUS 121Z or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Incorporate additional theoretical concepts in the performance of 'ukulele music.
  • Demonstrate intermediate level concepts in performances, e.g., triplets, arpeggios.
  • Sight-read tablature with increasing accuracy and musicianship.
  • Exhibit greater confidence in performing level-two repertoire.

MUS 130F : Slack Key Guitar Ensemble

Continuation of Music 122F. Increased emphasis on slack key literature, techniques, and tunings. Advanced intermediate techniques of slack key guitar as applied to ensemble playing.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Credit for MUS 122F.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Analyze repertoire for articulation, phrasing and fingering difficulties.
  • Incorporate intermediate level theoretical and technical concepts in the performance of chosen repertoire.
  • Sight read tablature notation with greater accuracy and musicianship.
  • Exhibit confidence in performing intermediate-level repertoire.

MUS 166 : Popular Music in America

A survey of Pop Music (including Blues, Jazz, Rock and Folk), in the United States in the twentieth century. Activities will include listening to recordings, writing lyrics and tunes and learning various aspects of the business of music. Fieldtrips and concert attendance required.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe the role of music in different communities.
  • Describe and compare the distinctive aural features and music aesthetics of the various style of popular music.
  • Describe the historical, religious, social and political aspects of a society that contribute to the development of diverse musical styles.
  • Compare/contrast different styles of popular music.

MUS 177 : Intro to Hawaiian Music

A survey of Hawaiian music from Polynesian origins and pre- contact traditional forms to acculturated and contemporary forms and expressions including vocal, instrumental and dance music in their social, cultural and religious contexts.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and define the basic concepts, terminology and distinguishing features of Western European and Hawaiian music.
  • Identify the distinguishing features of indigenous and post- contact Hawaiian music and musical instruments.
  • Explain or discuss the functions of music in pre-contact Hawaiian society and in contemporary Hawai‘i.
  • Identify and discuss important events and personalities in the evolution of Hawaiian music.
  • Put theories of Hawaiian music into practice in vocal and instrumental performances.

MUS 211 : Intro to HawaIIan Ensemble

Performance of Hawaiian music for groups of various sizes at an introductory level. Exploration of basic principles of history and development of ensemble performance. Students learn to play while singing. Ability to read music is not required. Repeatable up to 6 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in MUS 121Z, MUS 121F, MUS 121D, OR by instructor consent.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Discuss the history of Hawaiian music.
  • Apply basic musical concepts in accurate solo and ensemble performances.
  • Demonstrate professional performance practices.

MUS 221C : Piano 3

Continuation of MUS 122C. Increased emphasis on piano literature up to the intermediate level. Repeatable for up to 4 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in MUS 122C or consent of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Incorporate additional theoretical concepts in the performance of piano music.
  • Demonstrate musical concepts such as rhythm, notation, dynamics, and expression in accurate performances of the level-three repertoire.
  • Sight read music with increasing accuracy and musicianship.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices with level-three repertoire.

MUS 222C : Piano 4

Continuation of MUS 221C. Increased emphasis on piano technique and literature up to the intermediate level. Introduction to accompanying. Repeatable for up to 4 credits.

Credits:

2

Prerequisites:

Grade of C or better in MUS 221C or consent of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Apply, analyze, and discuss the form, articulation, rhythm, and phrasing of performance repertoire.
  • Provide logical fingering for repertoire pieces.
  • Learn and demonstrate professional performance practices with level-four repertoire.

MUS 240 : Introduction to Digital Music

Introduction to digital music and sound production on the Macintosh platform: MIDI sequencing, audio recording, music arranging, editing, mixing and mastering; preparing audio files for CD, video and web applications; sound synthesis and programming using virtual instruments. (Cross-listed as CM 240.)

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

MUS 108, 121 (alpha) or 253; or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use MIDI sequencing and audio recording software, and/or notation software, as tools for music composition, arranging and performance.
  • Apply basic skills in MIDI sequencing and editing, and digital audio recording and editing to audio mixing and mastering projects.
  • Prepare audio files for CD burning, and video and web applications.
  • Apply understanding of sound synthesis to create original sounds for music projects.
  • Transfer skills to other MIDI sequencing and digital audio software programs across PC and Mac platforms.

MUS 241 : Digital Music Production II

Continuation of principles and skills introduced in MUS 240. Digital music composition and audio production on the Macintosh platform with emphasis on advanced MIDI and mixing techniques, audio editing, sound synthesis, and programming of virtual instruments and effects.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

MUS 240 or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Advanced use of MIDI sequencing and audio recording software, or notation software, as tools for music composition, arranging and performance.
  • Apply advanced skills in MIDI sequencing and editing, and digital audio editing to music composition projects.
  • Effectively mix, bounce and prepare audio files for appropriate media and applications.
  • Create and edit original sounds and effects for music projects.
  • Transfer skills to other MIDI sequencing and digital audio software programs across PC and Mac platforms.

MUS 253 : Elementary Music in Action

Deals with musical concepts, philosophy & pedagogy; the use of media, singing, movement, and instruments; and resources for an active elementary classroom. Presents correlation between music and brain development in early childhood. Intended for Education majors. Music is a vital stimulus to the developmental process and contributes to the emergence of positive self-esteem. Elementary education candidates learn to apply appropriate strategies in order to provide music making as part of everyday classroom activities.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify and write the basic components of Western music notation.
  • Apply basic theoretical components of Western music notation to written examples of music.
  • Notate and read basic rhythm and melodic patterns, both in simple and compound meters.
  • Apply basic knowledge of basic theoretical concepts to performance on various instruments.
  • Teach a mini model lesson, demonstrating a grade-appropriate musical concept.
  • Harmonize simple melodies.

MUS 280 : Basic Theory and Aural Skills

Basic Theory and Aural Skills develops students’ skills in music reading and music perception through notation, sight singing and dictation exercises. Students learn how to notate simple rhythms in simple and compound time; learn to recognize intervals, scales, triads, seventh chords and harmonic functions; and learn how to analyze non-modulating harmonic progressions in root position.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for MUS 108

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Explain and use musical terminology at a beginning level.
  • Identify and use basic elements of music (pitch, scales, intervals, rhythm, meter) to create music at a beginning level.
  • Analyze music for its melodic, harmonic, rhythmic and formal qualities at a beginning level.

MUS 296 : Special Topics in Music

Students will investigate important topics in music, such as specific people, genres, or periods. Classes may include a performance component. Specific course information will be made available in the schedule of classes. May be repeated up to 9 credits with different topics.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Identify the important concepts and facts particular to the selected course topic.
  • Analyze and interpret the nature and significance of the selected course topic.
  • Investigate connections between the selected course topic and contemporary events and issues.