Biology

Classes

BIOL 100 : Human Biology

Introduction to structure and functions of cells, tissues, organs, and systems of the human body. Topics related to physical fitness, nutrition, health, and disease. Not intended for science majors. Students who have received credit for or are currently enrolled in ZOOL 101 may not receive credit for BIOL 100.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use scientific reasoning to answer a question about phenomena in our natural universe or to determine the validity of a scientific claim.
  • Distinguish between living things and inanimate objects.
  • Relate cell structure and function to the architecture and functioning of the human body.
  • Use information about the form (anatomy) and function (physiology) of the human body to make effective decisions about human health.
  • Describe the interrelationships between humans and their environments.

BIOL 100L : Human Biology Laboratory

LaboratorytoaccompanyBIOL100 (Human Biology). Emphasizes the application of the scientific method, basic laboratory methods and procedures in biology, and facts and principles of human anatomy and physiology.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit for or registration in BIOL 100 or equivalent preparation or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned in BIOL 100 to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret biological data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.
  • Demonstrate the use of some of the standard tools of the biological scientist, such as microscopes, scales, spectrophotometers, computers, and other analytical tools.
  • Apply the standard analytical procedures needed to study human biology, such as dissection, separation of biological compounds, microscopic examination of cells and tissues, membrane transport mechanisms, energy metabolism, genetics, digestion and nutrition, excretion, skeletal muscle physiology, cardiovascular function, nervous system function, respiration, and blood analyses.
  • Recognize and identify basic human tissue types and their distinguishing characteristics.
  • Demonstrate basic knowledge of anatomy (structure) and physiology (function) of the fetal pig (using preserved specimens) and human body (using models and figures).

BIOL 101 : Biology and Society

Historical development of scientific concepts, characteristics, and interaction of science and society from the perspective of biological sciences.

Credits:

4

Prerequisites:

Credit in MATH 25, 26, 29, 82 or higher or equivalent preparation; and placement in ENG 100, or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Distinguish science as a way of knowing from other epistemological systems.
  • Discuss the historical development of the discipline of biology into what it is today, relating the contributions made by significant individuals and concepts of the past to modern biology.
  • Explain the major integrating principles of biology.
  • Explain the origin and organization of the diversity of life on Earth.
  • Describe how living systems function, relating structure to function, at all levels within the hierarchy of life from molecules to the biosphere.
  • Solve problems in inheritance and genetics.
  • Present informed, rational and objective opinions on biologically-related issues important to human society.
  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret biological data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.
  • Demonstrate the use of some of the standard tools and methods of the biological scientist, such as microscopes, scales, spectrophotometers, computers, dissection dichotomous keys, and other analytical tools.
  • Identify the major systematic groups to which specimens of living things belong.

BIOL 124 : Environment and Ecology

A study of human ecology through the analysis of the interrelationships between science and technology, the means these provide for manipulation of environment and the effects of this manipulation on the environment and on human populations. Lecture/field trip course designed for non-science majors.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Explain the process and philosophical basis of scientific inquiry.
  • Describe the basic principles of ecology, including population ecology, community ecology, and ecosystem function.
  • Describe the characteristics of the major biomes and ecosystems of the Earth.
  • Describe the interrelationships between land, sea, the atmosphere and the living things that occupy these environments.
  • Discuss the role that humans play in affecting the characteristics of the environment.
  • Evaluate current environmental issues and problems including the solutions and management practices that have been used or offered to address these issues and problems.

BIOL 124L : Environment and Ecology Lab

Companion laboratory class to BIOL 124, Environment and Ecology. This class, providing hands-on experience in the laboratory and in the field, enhances the student’s understanding of basic environmental science and ecological concepts presented in BIOL 124.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit for or registration in BIOL 124 or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate environmental phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned in BIOL 124 to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret biological data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.
  • Demonstrate the use of some of the standard tools of the environmental scientist, such as microscopes, scales, spectrophotometers, various environmental meters, and basic statistical procedures.
  • Apply the standard analytical procedures needed to study the environment, such as soil analyses, water quality determinations, stream bioassessments, and quantitative resource inventories.
  • Conduct experiments that evaluate how environmental factors affect living organisms.

BIOL 171 : Introduction to Biology I

First semester of introductory biology for all life science majors. Topics include: Overview of the science of biology; Cell structure, chemistry, growth, and reproduction; Classical, chromosomal and molecular genetics; Evolution, phylogeny and systematics; and Biology and diversity of viruses and bacteria.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Develop and evaluate a scientific hypothesis.
  • Describe cell structure and function.
  • Describe how genetic characteristics are past from generation to generation and how they are manifested into the characteristics of the whole organism.
  • Explain how the process of biological evolution influenced the history of life on our planet.
  • Classify living things into a hierarchical system of groups based upon morphology, genetics, and phylogeny.
  • Describe the characteristics, systematics, and biology of viruses and bacteria.

BIOL 171L : Introduction to Biology I Lab

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 171.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit for or registration in BIOL 171

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned in BIOL 171 to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret biological data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.
  • Demonstrate the use of some of the standard tools of the biological scientist, such as microscopes, scales, spectrophotometers, computers, and other analytical tools.
  • Apply the standard analytical procedures of biology, such as chromatography, biochemical analyses, preparation of materials for microscopic examination, culture techniques, and statistical procedures (descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing).

BIOL 172 : Introduction to Biology II

Continuation of BIOL 171. Topics include: Origin of eukaryotic organisms, their general characteristics, life cycles, systematics and evolution; Anatomy, physiology and classification of higher plants; Anatomy, physiology, behavior and classification of animals; and Basic ecological principles.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for BIOL 171

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Contrast the general characteristics, life cycles, evolution and systematics of eukaryotic organisms.
  • Describe the detailed biology of higher plants.
  • Describe the detailed biology of animals.
  • Explain how interacting environmental factors (physical, chemical and biological) determine the distribution and abundance of living things.

BIOL 172L : Introduction to Biology II Lab

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 172.

Credits:

1

Corequisites:

BIOL 172.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned in BIOL 172 to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret biological data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.
  • Apply standard analytical procedures for the comparative study of plants and animals, such as the handling of living and preserved materials for study, dissection procedures, preparation of materials for microscopic examination, and use of dichotomous keys.
  • Identify the diagnostic anatomical features of organisms representing major groups of plants and animals.
  • Identify the major systematic groups to which specimens of plants and animals belong.

BIOL 200 : Coral Reefs

Introduction to the biology, ecology and geology of stony corals and the reef structures they build. Topics include, but not limited to, the following: photobiology, biochemistry, physiology, reproduction, ecology, biogeography and evolution of stony corals; contributions made by other members of the coral reef community, such as algae, invertebrates, fish, sea turtles, sea birds, and marine mammals; reef formation and geomorphology; corals as resources for human utilization and the impacts of human activities upon reefs throughout the world. Emphasis will be on Hawai‘i’s coral reefs, but comparisons will be made among reefs from other areas.

Credits:

3

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Explain the process and philosophical basis of scientific inquiry.
  • Distinguish between living things and inanimate objects.
  • Describe the classification of living things, the kinds of criteria used to classify them, and the formal protocol in naming them.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the biology of corals (e.g., systematics & classification, soft tissue morphology and cytology, skeletal morphology, endosymbiosis with zooxanthellae, modes of feeding, reproduction, environmental factors that influence growth and distribution, and evolution) with an emphasis on Hawaiian corals.
  • Describe the ecological relationships among the living components of coral reef communities and their interactions with the physical environment.
  • Describe the types of reefs and the processes that create and shape them.
  • Describe the resources that coral reefs provide, especially to Pacific island nations and states.
  • Describe the impacts of human activities on coral reefs and the significance of these impacts to Pacific island nations and states.

BIOL 200L : Coral Reef Laboratory and Field Studies

Laboratory and field studies of the biology, ecology, and geology of stony corals and the reef structures they build; companion course to BIOL 200.

Credits:

1

Prerequisites:

Credit for or registration in BIOL 200 or consent of instructor

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate biological phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned in BIOL 200 to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret biological data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.
  • Demonstrate the use of some of the standard tools of the biological scientist, such as microscopes, scales, spectrophotometers, computers, and other analytical tools.
  • Demonstrate the use of specialized tools and methods frequently used in the study of corals and coral reefs.

BIOL 265 : Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Principles of ecology and evolution for life science majors stressing integrated approach and recent advance.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

Credit for BIOL 171/171L and 172/172L; or one year of introductory college biology plus labs; or equivalent preparation; or consent of the instructor

Corequisites:

BIOL 265L; or consent of instructor

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Apply the appropriate terminology when describing, explaining, and applying ecological theory.
  • Summarize abiotic environmental features including climate, soil and geographical structure.
  • Identify the biological and physical structures of ecosystems, major biogeochemical cycles, and energy flow.
  • Examine the basic principles of population dynamics including birth and mortality rates, population growth models, life history strategies, competition and carrying capacity.
  • Define the interactions within communities including interspecific competition, predation, and mutualism.
  • Describe the evolutionary adaptations of organisms to their environment.
  • Give examples of evolutionary principles that produced unique island communities.
  • Evaluate the impact of habitat alteration and destruction, loss of biodiversity, and effects of alien species.
  • Interpret and produce tabular and graphical representations of information, including tables, graphs, and maps.
  • Locate and critique the value of printed and online resources.
  • Evaluate the consequences of population growth, increased resource use and pollution on global ecosystems.

BIOL 265L : Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Lab

Laboratory to accompany BIOL 265.

Credits:

1

Corequisites:

BIOL 265; or consent of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Use the scientific method of inquiry to investigate ecological and evolutionary phenomena.
  • Apply the concepts learned in BIOL 265 to an experimental and hands-on observational setting.
  • Apply standard analytical procedures for the study of evolution and ecology. These include the following areas of study: experimental design and set-up; descriptive statistics and hypothesis testing; age structure of a natural population; sampling and describing population attributes; sampling, describing, and quantifying the flora, fauna, and relevant abiotic characteristics of a terrestrial habitat; plant competition; optimal foraging theory; sampling and describing community characteristics and functions; primary productivity; natural selection; colonization and adaptive radiation of Hawaiian flora and fauna; taxonomy, systematics, and phylogenetics.
  • Collect, reduce, and interpret ecological and evolutionary data.
  • Prepare written objective reports describing and interpreting experimental and observational results.

BIOL 275 : Cell and Molecular Biology

Integrated cell and molecular biology for life science majors. Modern advances in recombinant DNA technology.

Credits:

3

Prerequisites:

“C” or better in BIOL171/171L and CHEM 272/272L or consent of instructor

Corequisites:

BIOL275L or consent of instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Describe the principles of cytology including cell organization, structures and functions.
  • Describe cell biochemistry including macromolecules of the cells, enzymes, membrane transport, cell signaling, and energy flow in cells during respiration and photosynthesis.
  • Describe the principles of genetics including DNA replication, protein synthesis, mitosis, meiosis, genetic recombination and gene expression.

BIOL 275L : Cell and Molecular Biology Lab

Laboratory for cell and molecular biology.

Credits:

1

Corequisites:

BIOL 275; or consent of the instructor.

Student Learning Outcomes Are:

  • Operate equipment used in cell and molecular biology laboratory.
  • Conduct experiments including DNA/RNA/protein extraction and electrophoresis, enzyme kinetics, ELISA, RFLP, PCR, gene expression.
  • Produce lab reports using the standard scientific format.